Darren Aronofsky’s Rules for Writing

Writers’ Block just screened Pi at the ARC in Stockton, for the first of our monthly cinema nights there. I did a bit of research (ie tried to get Wikipedia to do my job for me) for my expert introduction to the film and I stumbled across the rules that Aronofsky followed during the writing of Pi’s first draft. They’re good rules!

1. Always move forward. If you have a problem type through it.
2. Only take a break after something good happens on the page or you accomplish a goal. No breaks for confusion (type through it).
3. Ten pages a day minimum.
4. Only go back to add something. Do not remove contradictions, just make a note.
5. Do it. Suffer, live, cry, struggle for one week. You’ll feel like a million bucks by the fifteenth.
6. Have fun.

Taken from Darren Aronofsky’s diary of the making of Pi.

The screening went well. Only ten punters, but from tiny acorns all big elephants do grow, so hopefully there’ll be a few more in for next month’s screening of The Big Lebowski, which, let’s face it, is a bit more of a crowd pleaser what with it being more about quirky characters being funny and less heavy on the maths, insects, headaches, drills and whatnot. The maths, insects, headaches and drills demographic is dwindling, man.

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Concrete Schoolyard

Well this takes me back to my time in the L.A. hip hop underground. Ah, those were the days. MCing like a river rocking lyrical flow and experimenting with harmonic convergence, dynamic vocal inflections, and fly b-boy bravado. Basically kicking it old-school with that classic rap shit. And in many ways Jurassic 5 did the same.

Save It

I wrote and co-directed a film this weekend for the Go Green 48 hour film challenge. Our theme was “Save The Planet”. Inspiring!

You can see our entry here, and maybe rate it five stars so that I can go to Las Vegas, thus giving the film a massive carbon footprint. I think that would be good.

Of course, to view it you have to sign up to the 48 Go Green website, so I’d understand if you couldn’t be bothered. It’s only about saving the planet after all. Why not kill a polar bear while you’re not rating my film five stars? You might as well. God.

The External World

Wrongness on a scale usually used to measure earthquakes. Not work safe. Or home safe. Just generally unsafe. If you have 20 spare minutes I can recommend watching this for 17 of them and spending the other three giving your brain a shower.

It’s the new film by David O’Reilly, the Irish artist and animator, co-written by Vernon Chatman of Wonder Showzen glory, and featuring cameos by Adam Buxton and Julian Barrett. It’s a nightmarish thing, occasionally dipping into darkness-by-numbers, but mostly funny and unsettling in equal measure. And it’s visually stunning; all Atari-hued and glitchy, with an attention to detail that rewards repeat viewings – “Scalpel shop – free puppy with every purchase”. What?

It’s also, as I mentioned, ever so wrong.

Look at his website. David O’Reilly is 25. I hate him.

“Hhh. Typical”.